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Moving From Your Parents' House

So, you’ve decided to spread your wings, soar from the nest, set out on your own, and move out of your parents’ house. Sure, you love mom and dad you don’t want to overstay your welcome. Besides, it’s getting kind of awkward when you want to bring  certain company over.

Moving From Your Parents HouseIf you’re moving out of your parents’ house, kudos to you, but without mommy and daddy to fall back on, you want to make sure you know what to expect and how to prepare. Here are some tips on what you should know before you make your big move.

 After Moving From Your Parents House: Setting up Space 

Welcome to the concept of furniture. At first, setting up space may seem easy but, unlike what you’re used to, this is not just a bedroom we’re talking about. You’re going to need a place to sit at the very least, and you may want a table to eat at, as well.

You’ll probably be excited about the decoration aspect, but before you get to that, you’re going to need a few essentials. Think not only about furniture but about flatware, too. If you’re on a tight budget, start becoming a familiar face at Goodwill or look on Craigslist or eBay to find some good deals.

Remember, as your finances increase, you can always upgrade. For now, you just want to satisfy the creature comforts. As for decorations, start browsing second hand stores and garage sales, and don’t be afraid to negotiate. Save your money for a bit and then look into furnishing your space when you’ve accrued a sizable stash.

Signing A Lease on a Rental

Signing a lease on a rental is not like signing over your first-born child. In fact, usually, things go pretty well when you sign a lease. After all, it has worked well for over 43 million households, according to the Joint Center for Housing at Harvard University. However, it never hurts to go in with a little background.

Reading comprehension may not be your thing, but it is important to read the fine print on the rental carefully. Most of it is in legalese but do check to see how much it costs to break the lease. There can be some pretty costly strings attached.

Also, don’t rush in on a lease. Low rents can be very attractive, but sometimes you’re getting what you pay for. Make sure the building has the requisite safety features and that the apartment is spacious enough to accommodate you and your belongings.

Additionally, keep your friends close and your landlord closer. Check that your landlord lives nearby so he can come quickly when repairs are needed. Check into his background as well. Look him up on search engines and do some investigating.

Choosing A Roommate 

Monica and Rachel. Felix and Oscar. Joey and Chandler. If your knowledge of roommates comes from TV sitcoms, you may be somewhat disillusioned when you actually try to find one.

Sometimes looking for the roommate of your dreams can turn into a total nightmare.

Advertising online is a popular way of finding a roommate. Craigslist is one of the most popular websites and it’s also free. Others come with fees, but they do allow you to create more personalized profiles.

Friends can also provide good leads. Ask around, they know you and can probably be able to point you in the right direction.

A word to the wise:  no matter how friendly you plan to get with your roommates, don’t let down your guard when it comes to the interview process. Interview several roommates and meet with them several times and don’t be afraid to ask the tough questions.

Make sure that they know exactly how much they will be required to pay each month and that they have a steady income to back it up. You may also want to do some background checks on them on the internet to see if there are any red flags come up.

Moving From Your Parents' House Responsibilities You Take on After Moving Out of Your Parents’ House

Moving out of your parents’ place means that you are now the man or woman of the house, the master of your domain, the king, or queen, of your castle.  Freedom is a wonderful thing, but it also comes with responsibilities attached and in order to keep things running smoothly, you’re going to have to take on a lot of them.

Jobs

Take, for example, a job. Now that you’re paying the rent, cable bills, and other utilities, a steady income is essential. You may be able to slide on the rent for a month or two, but your new landlord is not likely to be that understanding if it continues to be a problem. Your job counts now more than ever; don’t call in sick unless you really are.

Laundry

Another important part of a job is looking the part, which means you’ll have to start keeping your clothes clean and pressed. Hopefully, your building has a laundry room, but even if it does, you’re going to have to start stocking up on quarters and fabric detergent and learning to separate the whites from the brights.  Professional cleaning is an option, but it can be pricey.

Taking Out the Garbage

Taking out the garbage is a rite of passage for all new home and apartment owners. If you didn’t do it before, now the responsibility is all yours.  Separate out recyclables and find out if there are designated containers for them in your building. The environment is something we all are responsible for.

Budget

When you set out on your own, the world is your playground. You can stay out as late as you want, eat out every night, go to movies, and hit the occasional bar. But all those things can add up financially. By drawing up a budget you can add them up beforehand to make sure you’re not going to go into arrears.

Make a list of your weekly expenses and income to make sure you are pulling in enough to cover what your spending. If you are over your limit, cutbacks may be in order. You may want to consider going to the grocery store instead of that burger shack on the corner or spending a few nights in front of Netflix. Moving out of your parents’ house may mean making a few sacrifices. Welcome to the wonderful world of adulting!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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